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Get answers to questions about Gifted Children now to Dr. Sandhu, Ph.D in Educational
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University of
Cambridge, UK.

What's Going On In There? How the Brain and Mind Develop in the First Five Years of Life
- By Lise Eliot, Ph.D

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~ B R A I N Y - Z I N E ~

" Learn How to Nurture A Smarter Kid "

Volume #10   Issue #17

ISSN: 0219-7642    February 19, 2012

Andrew Loh, Publisher

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Table of Contents
 
  1. Editorial
  2. BrainyZine Sponsor
  3. Feature Articles
  4. Ask an Expert
  5. Brainy Product
  6. Latest Brainy News
  7. Contact Us
Editorial
 

Hi,
Diane Loomans is a well-known and respected child and parenting author. Thought provoking and extremely intelligent, her books on parenting have been instant hits all over the world. One of her books " What all Children Want their Parents Know" is a literary gem on positive parenting. One of her famous verse on parenting is extremely emotive and truthful. She touches the heart, soul and emotions of every mother who wants to raise a positive child. Here is one of her famous verses:

If I had my child to raise all over again,
I'd build self-esteem first, and the house later.
I'd finger-paint more, and point the finger less.
I would do less correcting and more connecting.
I'd take my eyes off my watch, and watch with my eyes.
I'd take more hikes and fly more kites.
I'd stop playing serious, and seriously play.
I would run through more fields and gaze at more stars.
I'd do more hugging and less tugging.

In my view, positive parenting is an emotional issue and it connects parents and children in a cohesive and emotive bond. All the best!

Thought for today:
"Defer no time, delays have dangerous ends." - William Shakespeare

Best Regards,
Andrew Loh
Andrew Loh
Publisher & Editor, BrainyZine
mailto:andrew@brainy-child.com

BrainyZine Sponsor
 

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SmileMakers - your online teacher resource.

Feature Articles
 

Time Management Tips for Children
Time is precious for everyone, including children. Understanding how time works, is very critical, before learning time management techniques. With better time management principles, your children will know there is much more do with their classroom than they could do in the normal course.

Effective Time Management Techniques for Children
Every child is different in learning and attitude. You will have to keep these things in mind before initiating them to the art of time management. For young learners, you may wish to introduce pictorial and theme based exercises that relate to time management. Find out some of the simple time management techniques here.

Ask an Expert
 

Q1: My daughter received the WISC-IV at age 6 and obtained a full-scale score of 135. She also took the WIAT-II and scored within the 99.5 percentile in most areas. She is now 9 and the school wants to retest her. They say that she was young at the time of testing and her scores may not be accurate. She has skipped a grade and maintains an A average and is socially doing well. Is retesting her really necessary? How long are the scores valid for the tests she already took?

A: Intelligence tests, the standardised ones that are properly administered, accurately measured and interpreted, are believed to be the single, most accurate predictor of general intelligence and it does provides a snapshot of intellectual functioning at a point in time. Having said that, these scores may not be stable until around seven years of age, which is due to the rapid rate of neuropsychological development in early childhood... Continue to read Dr. Sandhu's answer on Validity of IQ Test Scores here.

Q2: My son is 8 years old. He has Autism but is very high functioning. He was given an IQ at age 5 of FS 121. He skipped part of 1st, 2nd, most of 3rd and now is in 4th. He is due for a re-evaluation and was found on the KTEA2 to score 148 math composite. His reading was 119 composite with written expression being his lowest at 106 composite (spelling was 122). The school won't identify him as gifted but I worry he will be burned out academically...

A: Your son clearly shows very high ability based on the scores you mentioned. I feel really disheartened that he is not being recognised for his strength, in fact denied the learning he badly deserves in school. He has highly above average skills in Math and he needs a differential learning programme to cater for his need. I am really surprised that the school does not see his ability which is evident in his test scores.... Continue to read Dr. Sandhu's answer on Twice Exceptional Gifted here.

Q3: My 9 year and 11 month old son recently took a psychoeducational assessment and the results came out to be quite uneven. For instance, in the WISC IV, he scored a VCI of 152 and PRI of 115, WMI of 135 and Processing Speed of 106. Due to the 37 points difference in VCI and PRI score, an FSIQ score was not derived....

A: The results surely indicate a rather mixed score which makes it difficult for determination and selection purposes. What is obvious is that his scores are definitely way higher than his peers, especially for VCI and WMI. It is also true (based on research) that the VCI is the best measure of giftedness. So, simply answered, yes, your son's score is definitely in the gifted range.... Continue to read Dr. Sandhu's answer on Large Discrepancy between the Verbal Comprehension and the Perceptual Reasoning Index on the WISC IV here.

Brainy Products
 

Time Management for Boys: A Quick Help Book
By A.T. Sorsa

This is a great little quick help book for boys who want to improve their time management and organizational skills. This book discusses of time management and how to organize your tasks to task lists. It also tells you how to use a calendar, a weekly planner, sticky notes, and colorful flags to improve your time management and organizational skills.

Time management refers to a range of skills, tools, and techniques used to manage time when accomplishing specific tasks, projects, and goals. It is a systematic way to prioritize your tasks in order to achieve your goals. Everyone needs to learn these time management and organizing skills in order to be more productive and to succeed at school, at job, and in life.

 

Time Management for Girls: A Quick Help Book
By A. T. Sorsa

This is a great little quick help book for girls who want to improve their time management and organizational skills. This book discusses of time management and how to organize your tasks to task lists. It also tells you how to use a calendar, a weekly planner, sticky notes, and colorful flags to improve your time management and organizational skills.

Time management refers to a range of skills, tools, and techniques used to manage time when accomplishing specific tasks, projects, and goals. It is a systematic way to prioritize your tasks in order to achieve your goals. Everyone needs to learn these time management and organizing skills in order to be more productive and to succeed at school, at job, and in life.

 


Latest Brainy News
 

Nurturing moms may help boost their child's brain development
Culture Map Feb 15, 2012

It should come as no surprise that a new study has found young children with loving, nurturing moms tend to develop a larger hippocampus, an area of the brain involved in learning, memory and stress response, by the time they reach school age.


Spanking may lower child's IQ: Canadian study
TVNZ Feb 8, 2012

Spanking children can cause long-term developmental damage and may even lower a child's IQ, according to a new Canadian analysis that seeks to shift the ethical debate over corporal punishment into the medical sphere.


Childhood abuse may stunt growth of part of brain involved in emotions
The Guardian Feb 13, 2012

Being sexually or emotionally abused as a child can affect the development of a part of the brain that controls memory and the regulation of emotions, a study suggests.


Television Kids Develop Attention Problems, Study Claims
IB Times Feb 03, 2012

Young children who have early exposure to television are more likely to develop an increased risk of behavioural and learning problems, according to a recent study.


Kids and video games - the positive side of gaming
Yahoo Feb 06, 2012

As concerned parents, we've all heard the arguments - video games rot the brain, lead to addiction, social isolation, the stunting of the imagination and in some cases extreme anti-social behaviour. Obviously there is a strong case for not allowing your child to play adult-themed games such as the Grand Theft Auto franchise, and no parent wants their child to turn into a video game addict, incapable of separating reality from fantasy. However, ruling out video games completely from your child's cultural diet can do more harm than good.


Who'd want to be a child prodigy?
Daily Maverick Feb 15, 2012

An American 14-year-old, who earned his first college diploma at age nine, has just released his first book explaining how other children can follow in his footsteps. REBECCA DAVIS considers whether this is a desirable route for a kid.



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