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Get answers to questions about Gifted Children now to Dr. Sandhu, Ph.D in Educational
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What's Going On In There? How the Brain and Mind Develop in the First Five Years of Life
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" Learn How to Nurture A Smarter Kid "

Volume #4   Issue #17

ISSN: 0219-7642    May 14, 2006

Andrew Loh, Publisher

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>> TABLE OF CONTENTS

  1. Editorial
  2. BrainyZine Sponsor
  3. Feature Articles
  4. Ask an Expert
  5. Brainy Product
  6. Latest Brainy News
  7. Contact Us

>> EDITORIAL

Hi,

"Happy Mother's Day", my second son eagerly gave her mother a 'necklace' he made at his kindergarten the other day. If you have kids in kindergarten, I believe you too will receive a handmade gift that touches your heart. That's the loveliest bond between a mother and a child. But as they grow older, will you lose that 'connection' with your child? At the moment when the umbilical cord was cut, I believe another 'invincible' connection is immediately formed between the child and the mother. Do you still have that 'invincible' connection with your mother?

============================

Mother
Author Unknown

After 21 years of marriage, my wife wanted me to take another woman out to dinner and a movie. She said, "I love you, but I know this other woman loves you and would love to spend some time with you."

The other woman that my wife wanted me to visit was my mother, who had been a widow for 19 years, but the demands of my work and my three children had made it possible to visit her only occasionally.

That night I called to invite her to go out for dinner and a movie. "What's wrong, are you well," she asked? My mother is the type of woman who suspects that a late night call or a surprise invitation is a sign of bad news.

"I thought that it would be pleasant to spend some time with you," I responded, "Just the two of us." She thought about it for a moment, and then said, "I would like that very much."

That Friday after work, as I drove over to pick her up I was a bit nervous. When I arrived at her house, I noticed that she, too, seemed to be nervous about our date. She waited in the door with her coat on. She had curled her hair and was wearing the dress that she had worn to celebrate her last wedding anniversary. She smiled from a face that was as radiant as an angel's.

"I told my friends that I was going to go out with my son, and they were impressed," she said, as she got into the car. "They can't wait to hear about our meeting."

We went to a restaurant that, although not elegant, was very nice and cozy. My mother took my arm as if she were the First Lady. After we sat down, I had to read the menu. Her eyes could only read large print.

Half way through the entries, I lifted my eyes and saw Mom sitting there staring at me. A nostalgic smile was on her lips. "It was I who used to have to read the menu when you were small," she said.

"Then it's time that you relax and let me return the favor," I responded.

During the dinner, we had an agreeable conversation---nothing extra-ordinary but catching up on recent events of each other's life. We talked so much that we missed the movie. As we arrived at her house later, she said, "I'll go out with you again, but only if you let me invite you."

I agreed.

"How was your dinner date?" asked my wife when I got home.

"Very nice; much more so than I could have imagined," I answered.

A few days later, my mother died of a massive heart attack. It happened so suddenly that I didn't have a chance to do anything for her.

Some time later, I received an envelope with a copy of a restaurant receipt from the same place mother and I had dined. An attached note said:

"I paid this bill in advance. I wasn't sure that I could be there; but nevertheless, I paid for two plates--one for you and the other for your wife. You will never know what that night meant for me. I love you son."

At that moment, I understood the importance of saying "I LOVE YOU" in time and to give our loved ones the time that they deserve.

Nothing in life is more important than your family. Give them the time they deserve, because these things cannot be put off till "some other time."

============================

Happy Mothers Day!

Best Regards,
Andrew Loh
Andrew Loh
Publisher & Editor, BrainyZine
andrew @ brainy-child.com

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>> FEATURE ARTICLE

Balance Your Roles: Partners vs Parents
By Kathryn Sansone

It is important to keep a healthy balance between thinking of ourselves as both partners and as parents. Find out different ways to achieve the right balance here!

Raising Boys
By Micheal Grose

The topic of raising boys is still a big interest to parents. It is no secret that many parents struggle when it comes to raising or even teaching boys. Boys are easy to raise and teach as long as you understand the trigger that motivates them.

>> ASK AN EXPERT

Q1: Could you tell me why I should or should not reveal my child's IQ score to them? I have someone that would really like to know, but most psychologist advice against this. I just want to know the reasoning against this, since one of the number one gripes of gifted kids is that they don't know what it means to be gifted and that everything about it is almost secretive.

A: Usually, psychologists do not encourage revealing IQ scores to children, unless there is a good reason to, which is not very common apart from perhaps curiosity on the child's part. Continue to read Dr. Sandhu's answer on Revealing IQ scores here.

Q2: My daughter is now 6. In 1st grade she tested in the 99th percentile across the board with Terra Nova and PALS 100%. Should I work on having her skipped again? Should I stop teaching her more advanced material although she wants to do it, or move to accommodate her need to learn at a more advanced rate?

A: Read Dr. Sandhu's answer on Skipping A Grade

Q3: I have a 4 years old son who sometimes seems very intelligence yet sometimes seems very slow. He has very specific interest in construction equipment. He reads, observes and studies them. He can name almost all the construction machines and explain the differences between one to the other....He doesn't like cartoons or any fairytale stories like most of his age of kids do, he doesn't like drawing or coloring, either. His speech and language is a mess... I wish to have my son tested and would like to find out from you the best age of doing an IQ test.

A: See Dr. Sandhu's complete answer on Appropriate Age for IQ Testing

Q4: I am writing because my oldest son is 3.5 years old I am believe he may be gifted. He has been able to speak in sentences and carry on a conversation since about 1.5 years of age. He has a comprehension that is unbelievable ... Now the reason I am pondering getting him tested is that me and my mother were both evaluated as children and both of us were gifted. We both had a hard time in school even though there was more opportunity for me...

A: See Dr. Sandhu's answer on Testing for Giftedness

>> BRAINY PRODUCTS


 

How Smart Is Your Baby?: Develop And Nurture Your Newborn's Full Potential
By Glenn Doman, Janet Doman

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


>> LATEST BRAINY NEWS


Feeding the brain
TheStar Apr 30, 2006

There is no doubt that good nutrition is crucial for building a healthy brain. Important nutrients such as essential fatty acids, amino acids, glucose, vitamins and minerals and water are necessary for maximum brain growth and performance.


Emotion beats IQ
Sunday Times Apr 30, 2006

PERTH parents are giving their children lessons in how to get along with others and stand up to bullies by boosting emotional intelligence, or EQ, which is overtaking IQ as a measure of future success.


Stress and motivation in learning
TheStar May 7, 2006

BRAIN-based learning is the informed process of using a group of practical strategies based on sound principles derived from brain research. It aims to help children learn according to how the brain learns best – naturally. It is a borderless approach to learning, crossing and drawing upon multiple disciplines such as chemistry, neurology, psychology, sociology, genetics, physiology and nutrition. This holistic and multidisciplinary approach increases the learning potential of every child.


More boys finding they're ahead of the game when they're held behind
South Bend Tribune May 9, 2006

Some also have been influenced by research indicating that boys typically mature at a slower rate than girls in key school readiness areas such as language and fine motor skills. About 11 percent of American boys entered kindergarten a year late in the 1990s, compared with about 6 percent of girls, according to the most recent national study.


Why Are Some Girls Maturing So Early?
KATU 2 May 8, 2006

Most parents would agree that kids are growing up fast these days, but it may surprise you that doctors and scientists agree as well, especially when it comes to girls.


New DVD Series Helps Healthcare Providers and Families Improve Brain Development in Preterm Infants
Yahoo! News May 10, 2006

Vida Health Communications, Inc. today released a new program series to help educate healthcare providers and families about care practices that improve developmental outcomes in preterm infants. The new series, called Promoting Preterm Infant Development, is based on research proving that long-term health outcomes for preterm infants are better when developmentally sensitive care practices are employed in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU).


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