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Get answers to questions about Gifted Children now to Dr. Sandhu, Ph.D in Educational
Psychology
(Gifted Education)
University of
Cambridge, UK.

What's Going On In There? How the Brain and Mind Develop in the First Five Years of Life
- By Lise Eliot, Ph.D

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~ B R A I N Y - Z I N E ~

" Learn How to Nurture A Smarter Kid "

Volume #12   Issue #17

ISSN: 0219-7642    Feb 9, 2014

Andrew Loh, Publisher

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Table of Contents
 
  1. Editorial
  2. BrainyZine Sponsor
  3. Feature Articles
  4. Ask an Expert
  5. Brainy Product
  6. Latest Brainy News
  7. Contact Us
Editorial
 

Hi,
Gifted children are always very curious and enthusiastic. They are open to receive new ideas and learn new things by asking trickier questions. When they ask questions to their parents and teachers, they never end and questions keep coming like waterfalls. Questions always provide answers and they give some sort of satisfaction to people who ask them. In other words, “questions lead to answers” and this is what Allan Pease titled his famous book – “Questions are the Answers.”

When gifted children ask repeated questions, they are learning an important life skill. When they ask a series of questions to their parents, they want to learn new things and know how they work. It is also natural that children always ask questions and in fact, they are never tired of it. Only, impatient parents are tired of answering questions and consequently they may even chide their children for asking too many questions.

Parents may need to teach their children how to ask right types of questions. Leading their children to ask precise questions will help them learn an important social skill apart from mastering many others that are not usually taught in the classroom. Sometime back, Nobel Prize winner, Naguib Mahfouz told an audience, “You can tell whether a man is clever by his answers. You can tell if a man is wise by his questions.” Have a nice day!

Thought for today:
"Nine tenths of education is encouragement." - Anatole France

Best Regards,
Andrew Loh
Andrew Loh
Publisher & Editor, BrainyZine
mailto:andrew@brainy-child.com

BrainyZine Sponsor
 

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Feature Articles
 

Gifted Children with Never-Ending Questions
Questions never end especially when gifted children ask them! Parents often get frustrated by these questions that seem to come at them like waterfalls. Click to learn more.

Gifted Children with Never-Ending Questions - Tips for Parents
Parents may need to show gifted children how good questions can lead to collecting right and useful information. Questions and answers are good tools to empower both gifted children and their parents. Read the article to learn more.

Ask an Expert
 

Q1: My son took the RIAS in 2007, when he was 8 yrs/8 mos old. He has expressed a desire to join Mensa, and is able to use the results of that RIAS to apply for membership. Mensa requires an "IQ" of 130 or higher. Is that the CIX result and is there a way for me to obtain what the PERCENTILES are for his scores? Also, can you provide any information on where I can obtain a notarized copy (stating that it is an actual copy of the original) of that document?.....

A: Generally, membership in Mensa is open to persons who have obtained a score within the upper 2 percent of the general population and this has to be done on an approved intelligence test that has been properly administered and supervised. You can find the list of approved intelligence test in your area by looking at their website..... Continue to read Dr. Sandhu's answer on Membership in Mensa here.

Q2: My son, aged 11, was tested and scored with GAI 128 (verbal understanding 118 and perceptual reasoning 131, full scale 118). Is he a gifted child? If so, do you think this is connected with mood change, stress, restlessness, sensitivity, depression and bedwetting? If so, what can I do to make his life less stressful and prevent psychological problems in the future? Any literature you can recommend? I'm afraid for his mental health and I need advice.

A: GAI (General Ability index) which is based only on two subsets of the WISC, which is the Verbal Comprehension Index (VCI) and the Perceptual Reasoning Index (PRI), hence not taking into account the Working Memory Index (WMI) and the Processing Speed Index (PSI). Children with learning disabilities, attention problems, or other neuropsychological issues may result in working memory and processing speed deficiencies which in turn lower the FSIQ (Full Scale IQ).... Continue to read Dr. Sandhu's answer on GAI score and Giftedness here.

Q3: I have a 9 year old son, who has been diagnosed with Aspergers. We/he is experiencing some challenges at school. Those challenges is what prompted us having him tested. We have always known he was Autistic, just didn't know where on the scale he was, until now. He was diagnosed two months ago. I had to take him back for more testing this week for a more educational diagnosis. We feel his current teacher is not adequate to help him achieve in the class room....

A: I am deeply sorry to hear how the school is treating this very special child. Unfortunately, it is a lack of training and understanding amongst the staff than blinds them in seeing gifts unless it is “within the norm”. Broadly speaking, individuals with Asperger syndrome have normal or above average intellectual capacity, and atypical or poorly developed social skills, often with emotional/social development or integration happening later than usual as a result... Continue to read Dr. Sandhu's answer on Child with Asperger Syndrome here.

Brainy Products
 

When Gifted Kids Don't Have All the Answers: How to Meet Their Social and Emotional Needs
By Jim Delisle, Ph.D. Judy Galbraith M.A.

This book offers proven, practical suggestions for encouraging social and emotional growth among gifted, talented, and creative children and youth. The authors explain what giftedness means, how gifted kids are identified, and how we might improve the identification process.

Then they take a close-up look at gifted kids from the inside out (their self-image and self-esteem) and the outside in (challenges to their well-being from their family, school, peers, and society in general). Complete with first-person stories, easy-to-use strategies, classroom-tested activities, guided discussions, and up-to-date resources, this book is for anyone committed to helping gifted children gain insights, find solutions, and know they're not alone.

 

Parents of Happy High Achievers: 45 Tips To Guide Your Kids To The Top Without Driving Them Nuts!
By Marjorie DelBello Ed.D.

Did you ever wonder what goes on behind the closed doors of families that raise happy top achievers? Wonder no more. After years working with well-rounded gifted students and their parents, author and educator, Dr. Marjorie DelBello shares simple strategies that shed light on talent development. It's sure to bump up any child's profile. No need to load up on the latest toys, electronics, or "smart pills." When it comes to growing top performers, readers will be amazed at how small steps can matter.

The Whole Child is the core focus of this book, which addresses many different age groups. Busy parents will appreciate its many lists and diverse strategies. This is not a book to be read once and put aside, but rather a handbook to be returned to time and again as issues arise and the child's needs change. Parents, grandparents, caregivers, and parenting presenters alike will appreciate its ease of use. It is the missing manual that many have been looking for.

 


Latest Brainy News
 

The Importance of Everyday Interactions for Early Brain Development
HHuffington Post Feb 03, 2014

Can you remember the last time you played peek-a-boo with a young child? You may think it is just a fun child's game, but actually it is helping brains of very young children develop.


Children who watch too much TV may have 'damaged brain structures'
Daily Mail Jan 10, 2013

Watching too much television can change the structure of a child's brain in a damaging way, according to a new study. Researchers found that the more time a child spent viewing TV, the more profound the brain alterations appeared to be


Gifted and Talented
WSHU Jan 27, 2014

Today is Mozart's anniversary. He was born on 27th January in 1756, and certainly fell into the category of gifted and talented children. He started playing the piano at the age of three, and composing at the age of six.


Puzzles Good for a Child's Developing Brain
Brookfield Now Jan 27, 2014

Did you know that puzzles can do more than just keep young ones and even older children entertained? Puzzles can help strengthen important brain skills.


Play, Learn, Succeed
Rockland Times Feb 06, 2014

When I watch my 3-year old grandson playing with his trains, sometimes I feel as if I can see right inside his brain, with gears spinning and lights flashing. I marvel as he makes up stories about getting to Grand Central on time and about how a little engine can pull three passenger cars up a steep hill.



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